Travelers With Disabilities

Laws have been passed that guarantee education, jobs and social services for disabled people in Costa Rica, but unfortunately, these law have yet to be implemented. So far there has not been much done in the way of improving access for those with limited mobility.

With a lack safe and well-constructed sidewalks, handicap-accessible restroom stalls, and accessible building entrances, it's not an ideal place for people who use wheelchairs or walkers. Walkways are similar in condition to most streets, peppered with potholes and ruts. Hallways in hotels are often very narrow.

For first-time visitors that are up for the challenge, it may be sensible to bring along a companion.

Though Costa Rica has a lot of room for improvement in making buildings and pedestrian routes handicap-accessible, this hasn't kept people away. The climate and the low cost of health care, as well as the inexpensive personal services that are available make Costa Rica an ideal place to live and vacation.


Home | Costa Rica 101 | Regional Overview | Traveling Basics | Fun & Adventure
Sport Fishing | Where to Stay | Luxury Hideaways | Spa & Yoga Retreat
Cosmetic Surgery | Tour & Travel Agencies | Flights and Cars
Getting Around | Retiring in Costa Rica | Real Estate
El Mercado | Photo Gallery | Maps | About Us
copyright ©2003 VivaCostaRica.com
Traveling Basics

Costa Rica Travel Disabled

Laws have been passed that guarantee education, jobs and social services for disabled people in Costa Rica, but unfortunately, these law have yet to be implemented.

HomeCosta Rica 101Regional OverviewTraveling BasicsFun & AdventureSport FishingWhere to StayLuxury HideawaysSpa & Yoga Retreats
Cosmetic SurgeryTour & Travel AgenciesFlights & CarsGetting AroundRetiring in Costa RicaReal EstateEl MercadoPhoto GalleryMapsAbout Us