Ways To Work

Unless you are able to display a skill or perform a task that is generally rare among the Tico workforce, foreigners are prohibited from working in Costa Rica. This regulation is designed to protect Tico jobs from being acquired by foreign residents.

Many of the jobs offered to foreigners involve moving to a remote location of Costa Rica. For instance, eco-tourism projects around the country will hire bilingual foreigners with managerial experience to help coordinate guided tours and attractions. If living in the city is more appealing to you, teaching and news reporting positions are available. Qualified teachers can find work at one of the many private schools in San José that instruct students in English, Japanese, French, and German. The Tico Times, the largest English speaking publication in Costa Rica, often hires reporters as well. Professional positions in medicine, law, engineering, and architecture are strongly protected for Ticos by professional associations making access very difficult for foreigners.


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Retiring in Costa Rica

Costa Rica Retirement - Work

Unless you are able to display a skill or perform a task that is generally rare among the Tico workforce, foreigners are prohibited from working in Costa Rica.

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